Public Release: 

'Fat, Fate and Disease'

Why we are losing the battle against obesity and chronic disease

Oxford University Press

Is exercise and health eating enough?

Can a one-size-fits all approach really work?

The world is encountering an epidemic of obesity, heart disease and diabetes. In the west it is already widespread and it is now exploding in the developing world with the rapid change in the lifestyles of recent generations.

"Fat, Fate and Diseases" explores the dominant myth that this epidemic can be tackled by focusing solely on adult lifestyles and asks the simple question: 'why are we losing the war against obesity and chronic diseases?'

World experts Sir Peter Gluckman and Professor Mark Hanson argue that the only public health strategy currently on offer - diet and exercise - has no chance of succeeding. The latest scientific evidence shows that much of the problem emerges in early life and even before birth. Social, cultural and biological factors are hugely important and there can be no 'one-size-fits all' solution, as different populations and people respond differently to living in the modern nutritionally rich world. Currently, these issues are being ignored in the fight against lifestyle diseases.

This fascinating book identifies the need to address these issues in two dimensions - a life course approach and consideration of the developmental challenges of countries emerging from socioeconomic transition. The authors discuss the complex interactions between health care and the food industry, suggesting that the food industry must be co-opted as an ally in this battle.

"Fat, Fate and Diseases" suggests new pathways forward in the battle against obesity and other lifestyle diseases.

  • Discusses the flawed approach to the weight-loss industry
  • Shows how scientific enterprise ignores the reality of the social, cultural and biological determinants
  • Reviews the scientific evidence that much of the problem emerges in early life and even before birth
  • It asks why the major global bodies fail to consider these dimensions and continue with flawed approaches
  • Suggests that the food industry must be made an ally in this battle
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Published 26th January

If you require any further information or would like to speak with the authors please contact:

Gabby Fletcher | Oxford University Press | gabby.fletcher@oup.com | 01865-35-39-69

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